2009 International Building Code - Structural Design

Course Outline

The International Building Code has been adopted by all 50 states and the District of Columbia. This course highlights the structural provisions contained in Chapter 16 of the 2009 International Building Code, and is designed to help structural engineers get familiar with the latest building code requirements.

Learning Objective

At the conclusion of this course, the student will:

  • Be familiar with the terminology used in structural design;
  • Be familiar with the required minimum live loads for different types of buildings;
  • Be familiar with the basic load combinations for the load and resistance factor design;
  • Be familiar with the basic load combinations for the allowable stress design;
  • Be familiar with the rain loads and flood loads;
  • Be familiar with the classification of seismic user groups and design categories;
  • Be familiar with the required design loads for handrails, grab bars and vehicle barriers;
  • Be familiar with the required load increase to include allowance for impact conditions;
  • Be familiar with the required minimum roof live loads for special roof structures;
  • Be familiar with the allowable story drift under the seismic loads;
  • Understand the permitted live load reduction;
  • Understand the exceptions to live load reduction;
  • Understand the alternate floor live load reduction;
  • Understand the live load posting requirement;
  • Understand the deflection limits under different types of loads;
  • Understand the anchorage requirements for concrete and masonry walls;
  • Understand the permitted load reduction under different load combinations;
  • Understand the special seismic load combinations;
  • Understand the various types of loads caused by moving cranes;
  • Be able to determine the importance factors for buildings and other structures;
  • Be able to calculate roof design live loads;
  • Be able to determine design loads for heliports;
  • Be able to determine ground and roof snow loads;
  • Be able to calculate snow drift and the amount of sliding snow;
  • Be able to determine wind and snow exposure category;
  • Be able to calculate wind loads for main windforce-resisting systems;
  • Be able to calculate wind loads for components and cladding;
  • Be able to determine the required lateral soil loads for earth retaining structures;
  • Be able to calculate seismic loads using the simplified method;
  • Be able to calculate seismic loads using the equivalent lateral force method; and
  • Have a better understanding of the structural design requirements contained in the IBC 2009.

Background Information

The International Code Council (ICC) was founded in 1994 as a non profit organization dedicated to developing a single set of comprehensive and coordinated national model construction codes. The founders of the ICC are Building Officials and Code Administrators International, Inc. (BOCA), International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO), and Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc. (SBCCI).

The first draft of the International Building Code was prepared in 1997. The first edition of the International Building Code (IBC 2000) was officially published in March 2000, following several public hearings in 1998 and 1999 and a public comment forum in 1997. Since then, IBC has been updated once every three years. Currently, all fifty states and the District of Columbia have adopted the IBC.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to help engineers and architects get familiar with the structural design provisions in the IBC 2009. In this course, you are required to study Sections 1601 through 1614 of the 2009 International Building Code. Because the IBC makes numerous references to ASCE-7, it is also necessary for you to have a copy of the ASCE 7-2005.

The live loads, wind loads and snow loads in the IBC 2009 are primarily based on the 2005 ASCE 7. To assist practicing engineers in wind load calculations, the IBC 2009 contains a simplified wind design provision and tabulated wind pressures for low-rise buildings (Section 1609.6).

Once you purchase this course, you can download the material. You are required to study Chapter 16 of the IBC 2009

The following contains the outline of Chapter 16 of the IBC 2009:

Chapter 16 - Structural Design

Table of Contents

  • Section 1601 - General
  • Section 1602 - Definitions
  • Section 1603 - Construction Documents
  • Section 1604 - General Design Requirements
  • Section 1605 - Load Combinations
  • Section 1606 - Dead Loads
  • Section 1607 - Live Loads
  • Section 1608 - Snow Loads
  • Section 1609 - Wind Loads
  • Section 1610 - Soil Lateral Load
  • Section 1611 - Rain Loads
  • Section 1612 - Flood Loads
  • Section 1613 - Earthquake Loads
  • Section 1614 - Structural Integrity

Course Summary

To protect the safety and welfare of the public, all professional engineers must get familiar with the latest building code requirements. This course and its quiz questions highlight the important structural provisions in the IBC 2009.